Working, playing and touring in Europe – advice for musical artists and support staff

This checklist is designed for musical artists (such as soloists, groups and orchestras) and all accompanying personnel (e.g. sound engineers) wishing to work, perform or tour in any country of the EU, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein.

Further information and support is available through the Export Helpdesk, accessible online or by calling the hotline on 0300 303 8955. UK businesses can use the service to get answers to questions practices on the export of products or services to Europe (including tours). . It provides access to intergovernmental information and assistance in one place.

1. Important checks

If you are traveling to an EU country, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein, you must:

  • Make sure your passport complies with passport rules
  • Make sure you have appropriate health and travel insurance coverage
  • Have your UK driving license with you (if you intend to drive)

If you are a musical artist or accompanying person traveling to work, perform or tour in an EU country, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein, you should take into account the additional requirements for travel from business.

Find out more:

Visit the EU, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein

Business travel: additional requirements

2. Visa / work permit

Many Member States have confirmed that they offer visa-free and work permit-free itineraries for UK musicians, performers and support staff undertaking short tours. The durations, definitions and requirements may vary from one Member State to another. As a musical artist (which may include teaching and educational roles) or as an accompanying staff, we strongly recommend that you check before traveling the national immigration rules for each European country in which you intend to work, play or tour, as the rules may vary depending on the length of your stay and the type of activity.

Find out more:

Provision of services and business trips to the EU, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein: country guides

Traveling to the EU, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein for work

3. Transport of musical instruments or equipment

Temporarily take musical instruments or equipment into the EU, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein

If you are temporarily taking your musical instrument or equipment outside the UK to work, play or tour in the EU, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein, you will need to check each country’s customs requirements. that you visit.

If your musical instruments or equipment are in your baggage or in a vehicle (“accompanied” – carried or taken by a person in their personal baggage, or a vehicle, which accompanies the person throughout their trip), you may be able to use a temporary admission procedure in the destination country, not paying duty on them going through the green lane or “nothing to declare”, or making an oral declaration for instruments and equipment of music to a border officer. This may mean that an ATA Carnet is not required in these circumstances. You can do this whether your musical instruments or equipment are intended for personal or professional use.

If your musical instruments or equipment are unaccompanied (“unaccompanied” – carried as freight by a carrier and / or transport operator where the person is not present), you can use an ATA Carnet as temporary admission procedure (there is a cost for this).

If you do not use the temporary admission regime by going through the green channel, by declaring your goods orally or by using an ATA Carnet, you may be required to declare your musical instruments or equipment and pay duties on these according to customs rules in the country of destination, each time they pass through customs.

Find out more:

Temporarily exit goods from the UK

How to use your ATA Carnet

List of goods applicable to oral and behavioral declarations

4. Transport of commercial goods, including goods

If you are taking commercial goods in your luggage to the EU, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein, to sell (eg goods), you should check the customs requirements of the country to which you are traveling. You will also need to declare your goods to customs according to the customs rules of the country of destination.

If you are bringing commercial goods into Great Britain (excluding return goods) that are not classified as controlled goods, valued at less than £ 1,500 and weighing less than 1,000 kg, you may make a oral statement to a border forces officer at the port if facilities exist; or use HMRC’s simple online declaration service before entering Great Britain. If you are bringing commercial goods into Britain that exceed any of these limits, you will need to submit complete customs declarations to HMRC which you can do on your own or by using a customs broker or intermediary.

Find out more:

How to export goods from Great Britain to the EU

Take commercial goods out of Great Britain in your luggage

Bring commercial goods to Great Britain in your luggage

Have someone handle customs for you

Taxation and Customs Union (European Commission page, not government policy, check customs requirements in each destination country)

5. Road transport

If you are using a UK based carrier (for example, as a travel promoter or tour operator) to transport your instruments, equipment or other cargo to the EU, you will need to take into account the movement restrictions imposed on UK based carriers. UK. Once in the EU, UK hauliers will be able to make up to two additional movements (transport or cabotage) within the EU, with a maximum of one cabotage movement in a 7-day period. Cabotage must take place in the same EU country where you first unloaded your goods brought into the EU.

If you transport both passengers and cargo using passenger vehicles called ‘dispatch vans’ you will not be subject to the movement restrictions imposed on UK based carriers – this means you will be subject to the Member State rules, as was the case before the and Cooperation Agreement. If you are using ‘dispatcher vans’ only to transport goods, you will be subject to movement restrictions imposed on UK based carriers.

Find out more

Transport within the EU

Transporting goods between Great Britain and the EU by Roll on Roll off (RoRo) freight: guide for carriers

6. Social security and income tax

If you only work or work temporarily in the EU, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein, you may be able to get a certificate or document from HMRC to continue paying national insurance contributions in the Kingdom. -United. This means that you will not have to pay social security contributions abroad.

You may need to pay UK income tax on any foreign income you earn while working or working in the EU, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein.

Find out more:

National insurance for UK workers working in the EEA or Switzerland

Foreign income tax

William N. Fernandez